Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Newsletter

NNSA’s Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly (SSQ), produced by the Office of Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, debuted in February 2011. Formerly, the Defense Science Quarterly newsletter, which covered the activities of the Science Campaign, the newsletter was renamed and expanded following a reorganization of NNSA’s Defense Programs. With its broader scope, the SSQ provides information about the research activities and news of the offices in the Office of Research, Development, Test and Evaluation.

Inside the pages of SSQ, you’ll read about some of the nation’s cutting edge research being conducted at our national laboratories and universities under the management of the Office of Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. The experimentally based scientific research that we manage provides a credible basis for assessment and certification by the NNSA to support the nation’s stockpile. You’ll also learn about our multi-faceted academic alliance programs in disciplines that support stockpile stewardship. We are committed to the success of these programs to maintain a perpetual pipeline of exceptional researchers, scientists, and engineers to the national laboratories.

We invite you to read the current issue of the SSQ to learn about recent activities and to also read the past issues to find out about our work and the many ways we support the stockpile. We have also included links to issues of the Defense Science Quarterly detailing some of the activities of the Science Campaign.
 

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly

SSQ Volume 4 (2014)
Number 1

SSQ Volume 3 (2013)
Number 4
Number 3
Number 2
Number 1

SSQ Volume 2 (2012)
Number 4
Number 3
Number 2
Number 1

SSQ Volume 1 (2011)
Number 4
Number 3
Number 2
Number 1

Defense Science Quarterly

2010
Summer 2010
Spring 2010
Winter 2010

2009
Fall 2009
Summer 2009
March 2009

2008
December 2008
August 2008
May 2008
February 2008

2007
November 2007
August 2007

Banner photo: Forty-eight final optic assemblies are symmetrically distributed around the upper and lower hemispheres of the target chamber (National  Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)